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Tips on How to Relieve Tendinitis

What Is Tendinitis?

Tendinitis (also called tendonitis) is an inflammation or irritation of a tendon, a thick cord that attaches bone to muscle.


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What Causes Tendinitis?

Tendinitis is most often caused by repetitive, minor impact on the affected area, or from a sudden more serious injury.

There are many activities that can cause tendinitis, including:

  • Gardening
  • Raking
  • Carpentry
  • Cleaning house
  • Shoveling
  • Painting
  • Scrubbing
  • Tennis
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Throwing and pitching

Where Does Tendinitis Occur?

Tendinitis can occur in almost any area of the body where a tendon connects a bone to a muscle. The most common places are:

  • Base of the thumb
  • Elbow
  • Shoulder
  • Hip
  • Knee
  • Achilles tendon

What Are the Symptoms of Tendinitis?

The symptoms of tendinitis include:

  • Pain at the site of the tendon and surrounding area. Pain may gradually build up or be sudden and severe, especially if calcium deposits are present.
  • Loss of motion in the shoulder, called "adhesive capsulitis" or frozen shoulder.

How Is Tendinitis Treated?

Initial treatment of tendinitis includes:

  • Avoiding activities that aggravate the problem
  • Resting the injured area
  • Icing the area the day of the injury
  • Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs or using topical anti-inflammatory gels such as Active 10 Pain Relief Cream.

How Is Tendinitis Treated?

If the condition does not improve in a week, see your doctor. You may need more advanced treatments, including:

  • Corticosteroid injections. Corticosteroids (often called simply "steroids") are often used because they work quickly to decrease the inflammation and pain.
  • Physical therapy. This can be very beneficial, especially for a "frozen shoulder." Physical therapy includes range-of-motion exercises and splinting (thumb, forearm, bands).
  • Surgery. This is only rarely needed for severe problems not responding to other treatments.

Source: WebMD.com